Sunday, April 30, 2017
Supporting Men > Psychology

Inconsiderate doesn’t provide a reason behind the tardiness

http://www.sciencealert.com/here-s-the-psychology-behind-why-some-people-are-always-late Plenty of research has gone into trying to figure out why some of us are like this. According to human behaviour writer and lecturer Alfie Kohn in a blog post on Psychology Today, saying these people are "inconsiderate" is accurate, but it doesn't provide a reason behind the tardiness. Kohn suggests a

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Psychology of a workplace bully

https://www.theguardian.com/careers/2017/mar/28/the-psychology-of-a-workplace-bully People wrongly assume bullies have low self-esteem, but their behaviour is actually a response to internalised shame. Although some people who live with shame have low self-esteem, those who behave like bullies tend to have high self-esteem and hubristic pride. They attack others to take away their shame – which

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Transform Your Outlook

If you or someone you know has trouble looking at the brighter side, these tips should help. https://t.co/c9TSMoWP6g— Psychology Today (@PsychToday) March 26, 2017 2. Practice thought-stopping. Before you can open yourself up to positive thinking, you've got to stop your negative thinking. When all of your thoughts are negative, negativity will

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Alienation, a lack of control, and uncertainly are all facts that lead someone towards a conspiracy worldview

http://www.newstatesman.com/science-tech/internet/2017/03/they-re-turning-frogs-gay-psychology-behind-internet-conspiracy Alienation, a lack of control, and uncertainly are all facts that lead someone towards a conspiracy worldview, explains Wood. As he puts it: “basically conspiracy theories are a way to try and make sense of the world that in that moment doesn’t particularly make sense.” According to Wood, victims of

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Just how useful our ability to delude ourselves can be

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/intimate-portrait/201703/self-deception-helps-us-accomplish-goals Recent research by Robert Trivers and his colleagues sheds light on just how useful our ability to delude ourselves can be. In a clever experiment, participants were asked to write a speech about a character after watching a series of videos of him engaging in positive, neutral, and negative actions.

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Neurological connections in the brain controlling speech production

Illustration of the neurological connections in the brain controlling speech production. (… https://t.co/fkhe8QVsWp pic.twitter.com/Q4ErjqGqDq — PsyPost.org (@PsyPost) March 19, 2017 Illustration of the neurological connections in the brain controlling speech production. (Credit: Stefan Fuertinger and Kristina Simonyan, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)

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